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P868 Understanding Venous Thromboembolism

C H A P T E R 2 Treatment may include: 77Medications. Various types of medications may be used in the treatment of DVT. Although anticoagulants (blood thinners) don’t destroy clots, they may keep the clot from growing and other PLAY VIDEO clots from forming. Treatment with Cholesterol blood thinners may last from three to six months. The most common side effect of blood-thinning medication is bleeding. Bruising or bleeding should be reported to your healthcare provider right away. 77 Thrombolysis. This procedure is used to dissolve a large clot. A thin tube called a catheter is inserted into the affected vein. X-rays are taken of the vein and the clot. Then, clot-dissolving medication is delivered to the clot through the catheter. In some cases, a mechanical device is also used to break up the clot. Although thrombolysis is a very effective treatment for blood clots, it has a small risk for serious bleeding complications. 77Angioplasty. This procedure may be used to widen the affected vein and improve blood flow. Narrowing (stenosis) of the vein can block blood flow and make it more likely for a blood clot to form. A catheter with a balloon on the end is inserted into the affected vein. X-rays are used to position the catheter. Once the catheter is in place, the balloon is inflated to widen your vein. In some cases a wire mesh device called a stent may also be placed in your vein to help keep it open. 77 Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. In some cases, a vena cava filter may be inserted via catheter into the vena cava (the large vein which returns blood from the body to the heart) of patients who can’t take medication or if blood thinners aren’t working. The filter is a kind of “clot catcher.” Your healthcare provider may perform this procedure if you have a blood clot in your leg. It may also be done before surgery, if you are at risk for pulmonary embolism. 10


P868 Understanding Venous Thromboembolism
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