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P1052 ABC Transitions in Care

For each drug you take, make sure you know: • The name of the drug and the dose (for example, 200 mg once a day) • When and how to take it (for example, with or without food) • Why you are taking the drug (some drugs have multiple uses) • What to do if you miss a dose • How your medications have changed, if you were taking any before you stayed in the hospital • Common side effects, and particularly side effects you should notify your doctor about (such as cough, If you are taking a blood thinner, call your doctor if you have: • A serious fall, or you hit your head • Pain, discomfort, or swelling at an injection or injury site • A lot of bruising on your skin • A lot of bleeding, such as nosebleeds or bleeding gums • Bloody or dark brown urine or black, tarry stool • Headache, dizziness, or weakness • Become pregnant or are planning to become pregnant • An infection or fever, or an illness that is causing vomiting or diarrhea Source: MedlinePlus 5 nightmares, or muscle pain) Ask your doctor or nurse for a list of your medications or have a loved one write them down to keep in your purse or wallet (including dosages), so you’ll have it for ready reference. ♥ If you have surgery What to Expect During Recovery Your recovery and recovery time will depend on your medical condition, your overall health before surgery, and any complications you may be getting over or recovering from. Your doctor will give you instructions on how to: • Care for your incisions as they heal • Recognize signs of infection or other complications • Take your medications (how often, with food, etc.) • Recognize potential side effects from medications • Recognize a worsening condition (such as weight gain for heart failure) • Cope with the after-effects of surgery. Aftereffects, including muscle pain or swelling, are normal. Other after-effects include loss of appetite, constipation, mood swings, depression, and problems sleeping. These usually go away with time. You will also be told about scheduling follow-up appointments, medications, and situations when you should call your doctor right away.


P1052 ABC Transitions in Care
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