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P1052 ABC Transitions in Care

There are more serious symptoms to watch for, however. Call your loved one’s doctor immediately if he or she has any of the following: • Weakness • A change in the usual regularity of • Dizziness their heartbeat, or an unusually fast heartbeat • Fainting • Fever above 100°F • Swelling, or rapid weight gain • Signs of infection (redness, swelling, • Fatigue drainage, or warmth) at or near • Shortness of breath incision sites • Chest pain with increased activity 13 Caring for Yourself As a caregiver, you want what’s best for your loved one; but don’t neglect your own health and well-being. Here’s some advice for taking care of yourself: • Maintain your physical health. Get at least some exercise each day: You’ll sleep better, lower your stress, and have more energy. Nourish yourself with healthy foods. • Remember your physical safety. Follow safe procedures when assisting your loved one to prevent back injuries and falls. • Get enough sleep. You may feel a difference immediately. • Seek help for anxiety and depression. Counseling or medications can often be effective in curbing the feelings of sadness often brought about by the changes in health of a loved one. • Take time to rest and relax. Read a book. Spend time with a friend. Get out and about. Ask family members, neighbors, friends, and others to help. • Be serious about seeking support. If someone asks, “Is there a way I can help?,” bring out a to-do list of errands, meal preparations, or visits with your loved one. It’s especially important to allow ALL family members an opportunity to assist in the care of their loved one. PLAY VIDEO Planning for Your Discharge


P1052 ABC Transitions in Care
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