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P1161_ABC_Pfizer_Living with FH

How Many People Have FH? About 1.3 million Americans have FH, according to the FH Foundation. Worldwide, about 1 in every 250 people have FH. It’s estimated that about 90% of people with FH are undiagnosed. They are at risk of serious cardiovascular events, such as a heart attack or stroke. Who Gets FH? As you just read, FH is genetically inherited—you get it from one or both parents. Some people are more likely to inherit FH from their parents. These include French Canadians, Ashkenazi Jews, Lebanese, and the Afrikaners of South Africa. People in these populations get FH more often, according to some estimates—perhaps as high as 1 in every 67 people. What Are the Symptoms of FH? Having high LDL cholesterol often has no symptoms. In fact, many people with high LDL cholesterol don’t know they have it until they have a blood test or, worse, a heart attack or stroke. That’s why getting your blood tested is very important. We’ll talk more about that a bit later in this guide. FH is a little different in this way, too—there are clear signs and symptoms. These can include: • Untreated LDL cholesterol levels that range from 190 mg/dL to 400 mg/dL, or sometimes even higher. • A family history of heart attacks at early ages, or high levels of total and LDL cholesterol. • LDL cholesterol levels in one or both parents that are high and difficult to treat. • Xanthomas (waxy deposits of cholesterol in the skin or tendons), xanthelasmas (yellowish cholesterol deposits in the eyelids), or corneal arcus (white, arcing cholesterol deposits around the cornea of the eye). • Angina (chest pain), which can be a symptom of heart disease. 4


P1161_ABC_Pfizer_Living with FH
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