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Medications For many people with FH, making lifestyle changes doesn’t bring their cholesterol numbers into a healthy range. That’s why medications are nearly always part of the treatment plan. This is especially true for people who have atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or are at high risk for getting it. • Statin: The first-line drug of choice is typically a statin. This class of drugs has been shown to be very effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events in people who have FH, such as heart attack and stroke. They lower cholesterol levels by blocking an enzyme needed to produce cholesterol. Each statin drug has varying degrees of additional benefits, which play a role in a doctor’s decision to prescribe one versus the other. As with any medication, statins have side effects, even though they are not common. If you have side effects from a statin you’re prescribed, talk with your doctor. Changing the dosing schedule, the type of statin prescribed, or the dosage can help reduce side effects. Sometimes, your doctor will order an additional blood test to see if something else may be causing your symptoms. In addition to statins, there are other cholesterol medications, as well. These include: • Bile acid sequestrants: These medications help lower LDL cholesterol by causing excess cholesterol to be used to create more bile acids, which in turn help rid the bloodstream of cholesterol. They’re often prescribed with statins. • Ezetimibe: This medication is called a cholesterol absorption inhibitor. It lowers LDL cholesterol by blocking the intestine from absorbing cholesterol. It is often used along with a statin. • Fibrates: These medications lower triglycerides and may help raise HDL cholesterol. They’re sometimes prescribed with statins, as well. When they are used in combination with statins, they can increase the risk of muscle problems. • Nicotinic acid: This medication lowers LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising HDL cholesterol. • PCSK9 inhibitors: PCSK9 inhibitors are often used to treat familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). This new class of medication is given by injection. It is used to further decrease levels of LDL cholesterol, in conjunction with other medications. Name of medication Dosage When to take it With or without food 10 My Medication List Use this chart to keep track of all your medications. Write down the name, dosage, and time of day to take each medication. Make a copy to keep in a binder so you can carry it with you. © 2016 ABC and StayWel . All rights reserved. A PATIENT RESOURCE GUIDE Living With Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) P1161_ABC_Pfizer_Living with FH_GTG.indd 1 10/20/16 8:44 PM My Medication List Click here to download and print this helpful tool to help you track your medications.


P1161_ABC_Pfizer_Living with FH
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